4 Great Business Leadership Books for Kindle

Quick Kindle Review

You’ve got your Kindle in hand. You’re ready to soak up all the business leadership knowledge your brain can handle. But you’re stumped. What should you read first? Don’t fret; we’ve got you covered. We took into consideration the “12 Business Books for 2012″ list CNBC.com produced, as well as some of the historically best-selling business leadership books, to recommend to you four great business leadership books for your Kindle.

Power Listening: Mastering the Most Critical Business Skill of All

Written by Bernard Ferrari, Power Listening brings forth some practical insights on how to truly listen in the business environment. Ferrari argues that good listening is not a passive act, but an active role that requires hard work from your part. He supports the idea that the skill of good listening can be developed over time, and he provides a step-by-step process for nurturing good listening habits in his readers. By developing these “power listening” skills, you will benefit through a new-found clarity of focus, greater efficiency, and an improvement in your decision-making. It is available for your Kindle for $12.99.

Taking People With You: The Only Way to Make Big Things Happen

Recognized as one of the best-performing CEOs by the Harvard Business Review, David Novak took his program, Taking People with You, which he has developed over the last 15 years as CEO of Yum! Brands, and presents it in a workbook-like format. In this book, Novak gets right to the point by teaching his readers the importance of setting big goals and how to set them. He also provides a step-by-step guide that teaches readers how to get people to work well together and to blow past their goals. After reading each chapter, you will be prompted to assess your leadership skills and take recommended steps to improve them. Ultimately, Novak wants to instill in readers the idea that no skill in business is more valuable than learning to get people passionate about and supportive of your business’s visions and goals. You can grab a copy on your Kindle for $12.99.

The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People

When you read Stephen Covey’s bestseller, you’ll find yourself jotting down notes in every chapter. The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People stresses the importance of making a “paradigm shift” in how you perceive and interpret the way the world works. It sounds like a tall order, but Covey guides you until you reach this important shift — a shift that ultimately affects how you value productivity, invest your time, and develop your pro-active attitude. Be sure to read Covey’s book front to back the first time. Then, take each lesson one at a time until you add each habit into your own personal arsenal of positive habits. You can purchase this book on Amazon for only $8.06.

Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap… and Others Don’t

What are the key determinants that make a company great rather than just good? In Good to Great, Jim Collins explores what is required of a business or an individual to go from good to great. Over five years of research went into producing this bestseller that explains the key attributes of greatness. Among the findings of the research, it was discovered that the leader most likely to help his or her company make the leap is one that is humble and strong-willed. One of the big take-aways from this book is the Hedgehog Concept. A hedgehog will consistently curl up into a ball of spikes for protection. The keyword here is “consistently.” Collins argues that a business that consistently takes the right actions over time will make the leap from good to great. There are many nuggets in this book that every businessman and businesswoman can utilize. You can read download it onto your Kindle for only $14.99.

Jason Comfrey is a human resources manager and guest author at Human Resources MBA, a site with guides and resources to assist prospective students in evaluating top-rated human resource MBA programs online.

More Popular Stories:






Subscribe

Leave a Reply