Book Review: The Other 8 Hours

What does your average workday look like? If waking up and falling asleep rim a day full of commuting, working, and TV, watch out. You just might be a zombie. At least that’s what Robert Pagliarini would call you, in a most endearing and well-meaning way possible.

Pagliarini, a CFA, entrepreneur and author, wants you to stop frittering away your life on mindless tasks. He encourages you to streamline and harness those precious eight hours you have between work and sleep. Once you do, your life and financial situation will markedly improve.

In The Other 8 Hours: Maximize Your Free Time to Create New Wealth & Purpose, Pagliarini gives you detailed instructions on how to replace your zombie habits with life-affirming creative ones. His new book shows you how to chop out all the activities and people who drain you. You learn to manage and prioritize your time, so that new income streams and a newfound sense of being alive result.

Sound like a tall order? Taken in aggregate, it is. But if you bite each piece off in digestable pieces, The Other 8 Hours can give you the tips and tricks you need to turn your wasted time into something personally and financially rewarding.

Content

Pagliarini starts off The Other 8 Hours by explaining why those eight hours we’re not working or sleeping are so important. He tells you why it’s common to feel stuck in a rut, and how to “jump out of” your staid state.

Freeing up your time is part strategy, part slash-and-burn. Pagliarini’s tips range from intuitive–get rid of unnecessary commitment—to innovative, like getting yourself a “boost job” that allows you to make money while spending your time accomplishing something else (think midnight tollbooth operator writing a novel). He also lists and gives solutions for 24 common “LifeLeeches” that suck your time away.

Now that he has shown you how to stop wasting time, Pagliarini gives you buiding blocks for transcending the rat race. A thirst for more status, money, and life than the consumer treadmill offers is an implicit requirement here. Assuming you have that, Pagliarini says to spend your other eight hours creating new moneymaking channels such as a business, an invention, or a book. You become what Pagliarini, in a swoop of marketing, calls a Cre8tor.

He gives you a chapter full of tips on getting your mind, support network, and systems set up to nurture a Cre8tor lifestyle. Then he shares 8 rules Cre8tors needs to follow, like limiting risk, keeping your day job, and owning the way you make your income.

Next, he goes into the top 10 Cre8tor channels for making income. These are basically side projects that can have good monetization potential. They are: Blogging, inventing, writing a book/screenplay/music, starting a company, reselling/licensing/affiliating, taking advantage of fads, working for stock, advancing careers, freelancing, and turning hobbies into income. He breaks each down into its own detailed chapter with rules, tips, resources, and diagrams.

After reading about each channel, you enter the Get a Life section of the book. Here, you find a handful of tips for rebuilding your life. These include uncovering your passions, learning about the characteristics you need to live a more fulfilled life, building good habits, making goals, and scheduling your day to accommodate your Cre8tor commitments, and more. He concludes the book with a helpful list of resources.

Thoughts

As a CFA, entrepreneur, media personality, and author, Robert Pagliarini is quite the multitasker. The book multitasks, too. It attempts to tutor you on self-improvement, goal-setting, starting your own business or side moneymaking gig, addressing deficiencies in your life, making more money, building healthier habits and relationships, and more.

As someone who values focus and simplicity, I found the content distracting at times. It’s not an easy, step-by-step guide on improving your life. Instead, it’s a tome of scattered tips–use them as you will. The value comes from the number and diversity of tips more than the overall trajectory of the book.

I most enjoyed Part I, which described the Great American Rut and gave useful tips on making your time work for you. I was already familiar with the idea of being a Cre8tor, as well as a few of the Cre8tor channels featured in Part II. In my experience, there’s a good amount of crapshoot involved in actually monetizing your book, blog, or freelance career. Pagliarini does emphasize that success is more of a batting average than a one-hit wonder. It helps to bear that in mind while reading through descriptions of Cre8tor channels.

Part III, which tells you how to get a life, almost sounded forced to me. Sure, repeating a mantra and setting goals are good ideas, but this section was missing the depth required to truly do life-building activities justice.

In terms of writing style, The Other 8 Hours is entertaining, and funny at times. Pagliarini incorporates tips and stories from real-life Crea8tors like Seth Godin. Its action-oriented tips give you solid starting points for improving your situation. It’s a fun, easy read.

I recommend it for anyone who feels stuck, wants to be more enterprising, and/or needs a kick in the butt in general.

Disclosure: We were sent a free copy of this book.

  • BB

    Who works only 8 hours a day??? Who doesn’t have family obligations? A commute? Have to make meals? What if your neighbor is a lousy cook?

  • I discovered this gap a few years back. well I may not necessarily be utilizing the “other 8 Hours” creating a business but I atleast invest in two. and that’s how I started an online business, that has since doubled my disposable income. Looks like it will be a good self improvement book.

    Mike