Hi rob_business–

We've found that a lot of people appreciate the middle-management perspective of the book. While the vast majority of sufferers of organizational problems are middle managers, it's often thought (and written about) that organizational issues are senior management's problem to fix. That's a pretty unsatisfying position if you're a middle manager!

By the same token, we've rarely see a situation where there isn't something a middle manager can do to improve a dysfunctional organization, at least at the margin. So the book (and the website: is really about that — what kind of an organization do you live in, and what can you do to improve it, no matter where you sit on the org chart.

Perhaps not surprisingly, when we talk to people who aren't senior managers about what's going on in their organizations, we get a very different picture than when we talk to senior management. In fact, senior management is almost always more optimistic about their organization's health than others in their organization–middle managers frequently report more dysfunction than their bosses do. So having that middle management perspective is really critical in assessing any organization's situation.

51 Ways to Define Leadership

–Karen (Booz Allen)

  • Hey Rob –

    You might get more milage out of this post if you attached a title to it.