University of the Southwest Online

The University of the Southwest traces its beginnings to the Hobbs Baptist College. It was established in 1962 and was envisioned by its founder to be a college for Christian education. After a series of expansion and name changes, it adapted its present name in 2008 to reflect the type of educational community the institution was evolving to. It is now comprised of the School of Arts and Sciences, School of Business, and the School of Education. The university is accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools-The Higher Learning Commission.

Online programs include the Master of Business Administration and the Master of Education offered in various concentrations such as Counseling: Mental Health, Counseling: School Counselor, Curriculum and Instruction: Bilingual, Curriculum and Instruction: Reading, Early Childhood Education, Educational Diagnostics, School Business Administration, and Special Education. Prospective students of the university can talk with any of the Admission Specialists to obtain complete information about admissions requirements. Basic requirements include a successful GED score, graduation from an accredited high school (for undergraduate programs), applicable transfer credits from an accredited college or university, and a special approval from the Admissions Committee when required.

Graduate tuition rate is $ 512.00 per credit hour while undergraduates pay $ 486.00 per credit hour. There are several sources for possible financial aid including institutional scholarships, federally-funded grants, state-funded grants and federal student loans. Textbooks and other learning materials can be obtained through the online bookstore.

US News and World Report Best Colleges 2011 Ranking puts University of the Southwest in 84th place among Tier I Regional Universities (West) Category. Princeton Review likewise recognizes the university as among the “Best in the West” in its 2010 Best Colleges: Region by Region.

Leave a response

Leave a Response