HP To Employees: Oops We Didn’t Fire You, Please Don’t Leave

Meg Whitman

HP told a group of employees that they wanted them to transition into contract workers for a partner named Ciber and that if they refused they would lose their jobs.

Several HP workers outright refused the request and they were told their services would no longer be required.

Now, HP is begging at least some of those workers to stay at the company, going so far as to pretend like the layoff ultimatum didn’t actually happen.

 

The company’s demands were handed down to several hundred employees in the Enterprise Services division, an HP consulting section.

Essentially the company wanted the employees to become contract workers instead of direct hires. Along with their new job would be a pay cut of 30% to 50%. The loss of their seniority would have also drastically reduced vacation days and the employees were told they would lose other benefits.

The company said they wouldn’t negotiate with those employees and would simply add them to the list of 80,000 other workers the failing tech company is in the process of laying off.

Why did the company back down? Many employees refused the “non-negotiable” warning and complained to their managers. HP then negotiated salaries that were closer to what employees were already making. Employees then refused to give up their seniority and benefits.

HP proceeded to fire employees who still refused but then had a change of heart when realizing that some workers were simply to valuable to dismiss.

 

 

 

HP is failing horribly and is expected to cut another 25,000 to 30,000 more employees in the next round of layoffs. The company splits into two entities on November 1.

 

Adding salt to the wound, HP is shipping most of its business unit jobs offshore with CEO Meg Whitman calling for 60% of jobs in the Enterprises Services division to be sent to low-cost areas.

Revolt or not, many Hewlett-Packard employees are still preparing to job hunt, if they aren’t already.

 

  • NolaM

    I was a faithful HP printer patron from the ealy 1990’s.
    When they went to time chip ink failure instead of actual ink levels?
    When it became cheaper to buy a new printer than new ink cartridges?
    I stopped buying them
    I know of many others that have done the same.
    They totally missed the change in people that have come to abhor the waste.
    People with a social conscious simply moved on to a greener product.
    Dead company walking.