Porn Industry Strategies

This industry continues to fascinate me because of the complex, socially scorned nature of their product. I wonder how does one porn company differentiate their product from another? What strategies do they use to maximize revenue? Well, here is a partial answer.

Password services have sprung up, often charging an annual fee to deliver access to hundreds of small sites, which share the subscription revenues.

Large firms also have consolidated power by providing free content to smaller "affiliate" sites. The affiliates post the free content and then try to channel visitors to the large sites, which give the smaller sites a percentage of the fees paid by those who sign up.

Another way some adult Webmasters make money is by forwarding traffic to another porn site in return for a small per-consumer fee. In many cases, the consumer is sent to the other sites involuntarily, which is known in the industry as "mousetrapping." Surfers who try to close out a window after visiting an adult site are sent to another Web page automatically. This can repeat dozens of times, causing users to panic and restart their computers in order to escape, the National Research Council found.

A fourth trend is for adult sites to cater to niche audiences.

"There's a Web site for just about every kink," said Scott Fayner, who writes for LukeFord.com, a site that posts porn industry news and gossip.

Very interesting stuff. But there are concerns with a product of this nature, such as the following.

"Dude, all of my friends are so obsessed with Internet porn that they can't sleep with their girlfriends unless they act like porn stars," a 26-year-old businessman told the article's author.

Uh oh. I smell a lawsuit. First it was Big Tobacco, then Big Food, next someone will sue Big Porn. All they have to do is say it is addictive and targets minors, and since America no longer believes in personal responsibility, some lawyers will get rich.

Now that is a good idea for a post – the business model of trial lawyers.